Nov 20, 2018  
2018-2019 University Catalog 
    
2018-2019 University Catalog

College of Health Sciences



Welcome to the College of Health Sciences

The College of Health Sciences offers outstanding educational programs for the preparation of allied health and health care management professionals. There are more than 200 different allied health fields, and allied health workers constitute nearly 60 percent of the health care workforce in the United States. Because of advances in treatment and technology, population growth and the aging of the population, the demand for allied health professionals is expected to increase significantly.

Allied health professionals and managers work in many different health care settings, including acute care, chronic care, primary care, community-based care, clinics, physicians’ offices, educational institutions, research facilities and industry settings. Patients served range from newborn infants and pediatric patients to adults and the  elderly.

In keeping with the Rush University practitioner-teacher model, the College of Health Sciences integrates patient care, research, scholarship and service into the teaching-learning process for our students. We strive to provide educational programs that are among the very best in preparing graduates to provide accessible, high-quality care for our patients and community.

Dean Charlotte Royeen, PhD
A. Watson Armour III Presidential Professor
Dean, College of Health Sciences

Overview

The College of Health Sciences, founded in 1975, is responsible for education and research in the allied health professions, including health care management. Rush University educates students as practitioners, scientists, teachers and leaders. As an integral component of Rush University, the College of Health Sciences  seeks to prepare excellent allied health practitioners and leaders to provide the very best care for our patients. In addition, the college makes meaningful and significant contributions to advancing health care through research, scholarship, service and practice.

The College of Health Sciences offers programs in 15 different professional areas housed within 10 academic departments. The college includes the departments of Cardiopulmonary Sciences (Cardiovascular Perfusion and Respiratory Care); Clinical Nutrition; Communication Disorders and Sciences (Audiology and Speech-Language Pathology); Health Sciences; Health Systems Management; Medical Laboratory Science; Medical Imaging Sciences (Imaging Sciences and Vascular Ultrasound); Occupational Therapy; Physician Assistant Studies; and Religion, Health and Human Values.

Programs and degrees offered within the college include the doctor of audiology (AuD), medical laboratory science (MS), clinical laboratory management (MS), specialist in blood bank (certificate), clinical nutrition dietetic internship (MS), clinical nutrition (MS), health sciences (BS, PhD), health systems management (MS), imaging sciences (BS), occupational therapy (OTD), cardiovascular perfusion (MS), physician assistant studies (MS), respiratory care (MS), speech-language pathology (MS), and vascular ultrasound technology (BS). The PhD in Health Sciences diploma is offered through a collaboration with the Division of Health Sciences within the Graduate College.

Organization

The organization of the College of Health Sciences centers around departments and programs, each headed by a department chairperson and program director who reports to the college dean.

The senior administrative and policy body of the College is the Chair’s Council, made up of the chairpersons from each of the college’s departments and a representative from the Faculty Council. The senior representative body of the college is the Faculty Council, which is comprises two faculty members elected from each department. Meetings of the Faculty Council are ordinarily held quarterly. Faculty may propose agenda items and guests are welcome by invitation.

Alumni Activities

Outstanding educational programs have outstanding alumni, and the College of Health Sciences encourages the development of strong ties with its graduates. All graduates are considered alumni of the College of Health Sciences. No dues are levied for membership in the college alumni association. In addition, each of the programs in the College of Health Sciences has an individual program alumni organization.

Further information about the College of Health Sciences can be obtained by contacting the Dean’s Office:

College of Health Sciences Dean’s Office
Rush University
600 So. Paulina St., Suite 1001
Chicago, IL
60612
312) 942-7120

Mission and Vision

Rush University’s purpose is to educate students as practitioners, scientists and teachers who will become leaders in advancing health care, and to further the advancement of knowledge through research. The College of Health Sciences, as an integral component of the University, seeks to prepare superb practitioners and leaders in the allied health professions to provide the very best care for our patients.

In addition, the college seeks to make meaningful and significant contributions in advancing health care through excellence in research, scholarship and service. In keeping with the Rush University practitioner-teacher model, the college integrates patient care, research, scholarship and service into the teaching-learning process of developing future allied health professionals and leaders.

Mission

The mission of the College of Health Sciences is to advance the quality and availability of health care through excellence in education, research and scholarship, service and patient care. The college promotes the values of diversity, access and inclusion in all of its endeavors.

Vision

The College of Health Sciences at Rush University will be a world-class school of allied health sciences whose programs are recognized as among the best in the United States.

Admission Requirements

Admission to the College of Health Sciences programs is on a competitive basis. Student selection is based on a number of factors, including overall grade-point average, prerequisite or science grade-point average, consistency of academic performance, coursework completed prior to application, examination scores, prior health care and life experiences and interpersonal abilities. The GRE graduate school entry exam score submission and a personal interview may be required by certain College of Health Sciences programs. For information on how to gain admission to a specific College of Health Sciences program, please consult the webpages for the relevant academic program at www.rushu.rush.edu/college-health-sciences/academic-programs.

Application Procedure

Application for admission into programs offered in the College of Health Sciences varies by program. For more information on application procedures, please consult the specific program and department webpages.

TOEFL Policy

All applicants whose native language is not English must present evidence of proficiency in English by satisfactorily completing the Test of English as a Foreign Language, or TOEFL, examination.

A total TOEFL score of at least 88 on the web-based version, at least a 570 on the paper-delivered version or 230 on the computer version must be achieved. For each of the three subtests (listening, structure/writing and reading), applicants may score no less than 20 on the computer version or 18 on the web-based and paper delivered versions of the TOEFL.

An official report of these scores must be received by the Admissions Office prior to the date(s) on which admission decisions are made for the program(s) to which the applicant has applied. To obtain information or to register to take the TOEFL, write directly to the Education Testing Service:

The Education Testing Service
P.O. Box 6151
Princeton, NJ 08541

United States

You may also wish to visit the TOEFL website at www.toefl.org. The applicant should indicate on the application for the examination that results should be sent to institution code No. 1676.

Applicants whose native language is not English and who have graduated from high school or successfully completed a higher education degree program (associate degree or higher) in the United States or one of its English-speaking protectorates may petition for a waiver of the TOEFL requirement to the College of Health Sciences’ Dean’s Office.

Waiver requests should include proof of receipt of a high school or college diploma from an accredited institution in the United States or one of its English-speaking protectorates. College or university degrees must be granted by a regionally accredited college or university to be considered for waiver of the TOEFL.

Philosophy of General Education

Undergraduate programs at Rush University prepare entry-level professionals for various roles in health care. The University strives to provide an environment where knowledgeable, informed and literate students are prepared to take their place, not only in the health care arena, but also as citizens of the world. The professional education builds on a solid general education, which forms the basis for lifelong learning and prepares graduates to be practitioners with social consciences.

Students are admitted to Rush University with general education sufficient to lay the groundwork for developing excellent written and verbal communication skills, critical thinking abilities, cultural sensitivity, high ethical standards and an inquiring mind. Students are expected to enter Rush University with foundations in communications, humanities, mathematics, physical/life sciences and social sciences.

The professional education offered by the University completes the student’s general education, resulting in a graduate who displays the following:

  • Communicates effectively in writing and speech
  • Demonstrates intellectual curiosity and critical thinking in the application of math and science to practice
  • Applies ethical principles to practice
  • Demonstrates ability to practice effectively in a diverse society
  • Exercises/expresses their social conscience to positively influence health care at local to global level

Academic Policies

Examination Policy

The examination policy is the responsibility of the individual course director who will inform students of examination requirements for that particular course. A time period at the end of the semester is provided for examinations. This time period may be used as the course director chooses.

Readmission

Any student who has withdrawn from a program or has not been enrolled for one or more semesters, as well as any dismissed student, may apply for readmission by submitting an application for this purpose. Applications for re-enrollment must be received at least three months before the planned return.

An interview may be required. A re-entering student must meet the conditions for re-enrollment stated in their dismissal or re-entry acceptance letter and all policies, requirements and course sequences in effect at the time of re-entry. Previously enrolled students may be considered as part of the pool of new applicants and are not guaranteed admission. The student will pay tuition and fees at the rates in effect at the time of re-enrollment.

Rush University Academic Policies

The Academic Resources and Policies section of this catalog contains additional Rush University academic policies.

Student Professional and Community Service Requirement

Participation in service activities is an important attribute of the health science professional. A hallmark of outstanding Rush students and alumni is the desire and ability to make meaningful service contributions. Community service activities may include volunteer activities (health fairs and clinics, health education, provision of health services to at-risk or disadvantaged populations, and other outreach education or clinical activities) and service on community boards, committees, work groups and other service activities that promote the health and well-being of the community and its members. Professional service may include participation in the provision of state, national or international activities to advance the quality, access and effectiveness of health care services provided by allied health professionals.

Achievement of the College of Health Sciences Excellence in Service Goal is demonstrated in part through the following:

  1. Student and faculty participation in community service activities
  2. Student satisfaction with, and appreciation for, community service
  3. Students and faculty who provide leadership and support to professional associations, boards and committees
  4. Provision of community and professional continuing education to local, national and international audiences


In order to support achievement of the college’s service excellence goals and objectives, the college has developed a professional and community service requirement for all College of Health Sciences students as a part of their academic programs.

As a requirement for program completion, each academic degree granting program will establish a minimum service requirement for each student enrolled in the program of at least 16 contact hours of approved professional or community service.

Examples of activities that may be used to meet this requirement include participation in community health fairs; community health screening and/or health services; provision of community health education; participation in approved professional service and/or continuing education activities; and assistance with the delivery of seminars, lectures, workshops and related community or professional continuing education activities.

Conduct and Ethics

Students are expected to conduct themselves in a professional manner at all times - in a manner that conforms to the ethics of the health professions and instills confidence in their abilities as health care professionals. Each student is expected to conform to the professional code of ethics as outlined in their departmental student handbook.

Irresponsible, unprofessional or unethical behavior may result in disciplinary action, which may include suspension or dismissal from the college. All clinical agency or hospital regulations are to be followed by students when undergoing clinical or other training in a facility. For additional information, students should refer to the Rush University Statement on Academic Honesty and Student Conduct and the Rush University Medical Center Code of Conduct.

Scholastic Dishonesty and Cheating

The College of Health Sciences will not condone cheating in any form. Allegations of cheating will be reviewed by the departmental Committee on Progress and Promotions.

Any student found to be cheating on an examination may receive a 0 for the examination and will be subject to formal disciplinary action, which may include suspension or dismissal from the program. Failure to report incidents involving scholastic dishonesty on the part of another student will be considered unprofessional conduct and may also result in disciplinary action. Students should refer to the Rush University Policy on Academic Honesty and Student Conduct for further information.

HIPAA and Patient Privacy

Rush University students have a legal and ethical responsibility to safeguard the privacy of all patients and protect confidentiality and security of all health information. Protecting the confidentiality of patient information means protecting it from unauthorized use or disclosure in any format, including verbal, fax, written or electronic/computer. Patient confidentiality is a central obligation of patient care. Any breaches in patient confidentiality or privacy may result in disciplinary action, up to and including dismissal from the college.

The laboratory component of some courses may use students as simulated patients. This is particularly true for the patient evaluation, medicine and patient education components. Additionally, the sharing of personal experiences can be a rich resource in the development of students’ understanding, knowledge and appreciation of disease, health care and impact on peoples’ lives.

Practicing the medical history and physical examination of patients places students in close contact and leads to the sharing of personal information and physical findings. Similarly, students may use personal experiences in patient role-playing exercises.

All shared and personal medical information and physical examination findings are to be treated with utmost confidentiality- the same as for any patient contact. Failure to protect the confidentiality of any information related to the activities in a course or clinical rotation may result in disciplinary action, up to and including suspension or dismissal from the college. For additional information, students should refer to the Rush University HIPAA policy and the Rush University Policy on Privacy and Confidentiality of Student Records and FERPA.

Guide to Professional Conduct

Professionalism relates to the intellectual, ethical, behavioral and attitudinal attributes necessary to perform as a health care provider or manager. As it applies to their professional role, the student will be expected to do the following:

Attend

  1. Demonstrate awareness of the importance of learning by asking pertinent questions, identifying areas of importance in practice, and reporting and recording those areas
  2. Avoid disruptive behavior in class, laboratory and clinical or practicum rotations, such as talking or other activities that interfere with effective teaching and learning

Participate

  1. Complete assigned work and prepare for class, laboratory and clinical or practicum objectives prior to attending
  2. Participate in formal and informal discussions, answer questions, report on experiences and volunteer for special tasks and research
  3. Initiate alteration in patient care techniques when appropriate via notification of instructors, staff and physicians

Dependability and Appearance

  1. Attend and be punctual and reliable in completing assignments with minimal instructor supervision
  2. Promote a professional demeanor by appropriate hygiene, grooming and attire

Communicate

  1. Demonstrate a pleasant and positive attitude when dealing with patients and coworkers by greeting them by name, approaching them in a non-threatening manner and setting them at ease
  2. Explain procedures clearly to the patient
  3. Ask patients how they feel and solicit patient comments regarding the patient’s overall condition and response to assessment and/or therapy
  4. Communicate clearly to staff and physicians regarding the patient status, utilizing appropriate charting, oral communication and the established chain of command
  5. Demonstrate a pleasant and positive attitude when dealing with coworkers, instructors, faculty, nurses and physicians

Organize

  1. Display recognition of the importance of interpersonal relationships with students, faculty and other members of the health care team by acting in a cordial and pleasant manner
  2. Work as a team with fellow students, instructors, nursing staff and the physician in providing patient care
  3. Organize work assignments effectively
  4. Collect information from appropriate resources
  5. Correlate care to overall patient condition
  6. Adapt care techniques to overcome difficulties
  7. Devise or suggest new techniques for patient welfare or unit efficiency

Be Safe

  1. Verify identity of patients before initiating therapeutic action.
  2. Interpret written information and verbal directions correctly
  3. Observe and report significant changes in patient’s condition promptly to appropriate person(s)
  4. Act to prevent accidents and injury to patients, personnel and self
  5. Transfer previously learned theory and skills to new/different patient situations
  6. Request help from faculty/staff when unsure
  7. Comply with hospital and university guidelines for performance

The following are examples of critical errors in professional conduct and judgment:

  1. Failure to place the patient’s welfare as first priority
  2. Failure to maintain physical, mental and emotional composure
  3. Consistent ineffective or inefficient use of time
  4. Failure to be appropriately honest with patients, faculty and colleagues
  5. Scholastic dishonesty in any form
  6. Failure to follow the Rush University Medical Center Code of Conduct

Procedure for Unprofessional Conduct

For specific rules regarding the procedures for unprofessional conduct, please refer to the departmental or program student handbook. In general, for issues that are not satisfactorily resolved between the instructor and student, the following guidelines should be followed for unprofessional conduct:

Step 1. The student will have been identified as violating an established standard of professional conduct/judgment or moral/ ethical behavior, and the department chair or program director will have been notified.

Step 2. The department chairperson or program director will meet with the individual(s) making the allegation and the student’s faculty adviser to review the available information and determine the veracity of the allegations.

Step 3. The department chairperson, student and faculty adviser, whenever possible, will meet as promptly as possible after the alleged incident. The department chairperson will report to the student the facts and available information and will seek to authenticate or clarify the allegations where possible. If it is determined that there is no basis for the allegation, no further action will be taken.

Step 4. If it is determined that there is a basis for the allegation and that further investigation is necessary, a preliminary hearing of the departmental Committee on Progress and Promotions will be convened to review the allegations and recommend a course of action. The department chairperson will inform the student and the dean in writing of the preliminary hearing and the following:

  • Date
  • Name of student
  • Nature of the allegations
  • Date of alleged incident/occurrence
  • Professional attributes that allegedly violate standards: skill, behavior, judgment, ethical values, etc.

For more information regarding the procedures for handling instances of unprofessional conduct, see the current departmental student handbook, University Catalog and the College of Health Sciences Policies and Procedures for the Rush University Rules for Governance.

Incidents in the Clinical Agency

An incident that affects patients’ or staff’s well-being, or the patient’s prescribed care, will be reported to the clinical instructor or preceptor immediately. An institutional incident report will then be completed following the policy of the health care institution or hospital in which the incident occurred. A duplicate of the hospital incident report, as well as a memorandum of explanation from the clinical instructor or preceptor, will be placed in the student’s clinical file, and the department chairperson, program director or clinical director will be notified immediately. Incidents involving gross errors in judgment or practice on the part of the student will constitute grounds for dismissal from the program.

Criminal Background Checks and Drug Testing

Programs offered in the College of Health Sciences often require that clinical rotations, practica, internships or other learning experiences be successfully completed in hospitals and other health care facilities in order to meet program requirements. Because the use of these facilities is required, students must be able to successfully complete their assigned rotations in order to fulfill the academic requirements of their program.

Hospitals and other health care facilities often have policies requiring criminal background checks for employees, students and volunteers. These facilities may refuse to accept individuals for clinical, practicum or other experiential rotations based on past criminal convictions.

Students should be prepared to comply with the policies and procedures at any facility where they are assigned as part of their educational program and may not request facility assignments in an effort to avoid specific requirements. Students who have certain types of information in their criminal background checks may be ineligible to complete rotations in specific facilities. Students who are not allowed to participate at assigned facilities or who are terminated from rotations based on the results of a criminal background check will be unable to complete the program requirements for graduation and will be subject to dismissal on academic grounds.

Students should also be advised that persons with certain types of criminal convictions may not be eligible for state licensure or national registry or certification, or both. In addition, many employers perform criminal background checks and may not hire individuals with certain types of criminal convictions.

Drug Testing

Hospitals and other health care facilities often have policies requiring drug testing for employees, students and volunteers. Some facilities provide that students who test positive for drugs are ineligible to complete clinical, practicum or work assignments in that facility. Students should be prepared to comply with the policies and procedures at any assigned facility and may not request facility assignments in an effort to avoid drug screening requirements. Students who fail to report for clinical or practicum assignments or who are terminated from rotations because they violate the drug-testing or drug-use policies of the facilities will be subject to dismissal from the program.

Procedures Implementing Academic Accommodation for Students with Disabilities

Rush University is committed to diversity, and attracting and educating students who will make the population of health care professionals representative of the national population.

Our core values - I CARE (innovation, collaboration, accountability, respect and excellence) - translate into our work with all students, including those with disabilities. Rush actively collaborates with students to develop innovative ways to ensure accessibility and creates a respectful, accountable culture through our confidential and specialized disability support.

Rush is committed to excellence in accessibility; we encourage students with disabilities to disclose and seek accommodations. Students who may need special accommodations can access this information at www.rushu.rush.edu/office-student-disability-services.

Student Government

A Student Government Association exists for the students enrolled in the College of Health Sciences. Student representatives will be elected by the student body in such a manner as to provide appropriate representation for all students in the College of Health Sciences.

Release of Student Information

Students must sign a release requesting enrollment verification, verification of degree, recommendations, letters of reference or release of other student information. For a Letter of Degree or Enrollment Verification, the student should use the form provided by the Office of the Registrar. The Office of the Registrar is the only office at Rush University authorized to release enrollment or degree verification information.

For recommendations or letters of reference, a release form is required for personally identifiable information from a student’s education record given out by College of Health Sciences faculty. (Please note: The College of Health Sciences requires that all recommendations or letters of reference - even if they are based upon the recommender’s personal observation or knowledge - have a release form on file before the person writing the recommendation can release the recommendation or letter of reference.)

Student grades will not be posted and cannot be given out over the telephone or via email.

For additional information, students should refer to the Rush University Policy on Privacy and Confidentiality of Student Records and FERPA.

Student Academic Appeal and Grievance Procedures

The College of Health Sciences student appeals and grievance procedures provide a mechanism allowing student to obtain a review of a complaint of unfair treatment. The student appeals procedures shall not be used to question a rule, procedure or policy established by an authorized faculty or administrative body. Rather, it shall be used to provide due process for those who believe that a rule, procedure or policy has been applied in an unfair or inequitable manner, or that there has been unfair or improper treatment by a person or persons.

Students who are appealing an academic decision that could result in a dismissal from the University may be allowed to continue to progress in the program until the issue is resolved. If the academic decision is upheld and the student is dismissed from the University, they will be withdrawn from their current classes. This withdrawal will be backdated to before the beginning of the term,  and the student will receive 100 percent tuition reimbursement for that term.

A student wishing to appeal an academic decision should follow the process summarized below in the sequence indicated:

Step 1. In the academic community, the responsibility for course development, course delivery and the assessment of student achievement rests primarily with each course instructor. Any student who has a complaint of inappropriate treatment related to a course should first seek to resolve it informally with the course instructor. If the course instructor is the department chairperson or if the complaint does not pertain to a specific course, the student should seek resolution with the department chairperson at the outset.

  1. A student with such a complaint must request reconsideration, in writing, of the application of a rule, procedure or policy, or unfair or improper treatment within five working days following the incident that forms the basis for the complaint (e.g., five days after grades are posted).
  2. The instructor will meet with the student or speak with the student via telephone for those students who are unable to come to the chairperson’s office, if so requested by the student. The instructor will notify the student in writing of the decision regarding the complaint within five working days following the meeting or discussion.

Step 2. If resolution is not achieved informally, as described in Step 1, the student should seek resolution with the chairperson of the department in which the course is offered within five working days following notification by the instructor of their decision.

  1. The chairperson will meet with the student - or speak with the student via telephone for those students unable to come to the chairperson’s office if so requested by the student - following receipt of the student’s request for resolution to discuss the problem or complaint.
  2. The chairperson will notify the student of their decision in writing following the meeting or discussion.

Step 3. If the issue was not resolved in Step 2, the student may submit a written appeal, describing the nature of the student’s complaint and reasons for seeking an appeal, to the student progress and promotion committee of the department within five working days following notification by the department chairperson of their decision.

  1. The student may appear before the committee in person, make an oral statement and answer questions from the committee. The student will not be allowed to be present during committee deliberations.
  2. The committee may request that the course instructor or faculty member named in the grievance appear before the committee to make an oral statement and answer questions. The instructor or faculty member named in the grievance may not be present during committee deliberations.
  3. Following review of information provided, the committee will notify the student of its decision.

Step 4. If the issue was not resolved to the student’s satisfaction in Step 3, the student may submit a written request seeking a hearing to the dean within five working days of receiving the department progress and promotion committee decision. The written request should include a description of the complaint and the reason the student is seeking an appeal.

  1. The dean will meet with the student for a hearing following receipt of the written request from the.
  2. Following the meeting with the student, the dean may render a decision or choose to appoint a panel to investigate the grievance and make a recommendation to the dean.

Following review of the information provided and any recommendations from the panel, should one be appointed, the dean will then notify the student of their decision. The decision of the dean shall be final.

Addendum to the Academic Appeal and Grievance Process

When a student appeal reaches the level of the dean of the College of Health Sciences, the dean may refer the case to a committee for the purpose of investigating the appeal or grievance and making a recommendation to the dean. The purpose of this addendum is to describe the procedure followed by the committee.

The College of Health Sciences has established a standing committee of 10 members of its Faculty Council.  The committee members will be determined each fall for the subsequent year. Five members will be selected from the standing committee, as available and appropriate, to serve on an appeals hearing committee. The five members will include a designated chair of the committee, who will be the chair of the Faculty Council if available. If the chair of the Faculty Council cannot serve as chair of the committee, one of the five selected committee members will be appointed as chair of the appeals committee by the chair of the Faculty Council.

If a member of the standing committee is in the same department as the student involved or has a conflict of interest related to the student, the committee member shall recuse from the hearing. Faculty who are also students in the College of Health Sciences program that the student is enrolled in may not serve on the standing committee.

The hearing will be closed and confidential, all documentation related to the appeal shall be kept confidential and its distribution limited to individuals on a need-to-know basis. Transcripts of a hearing are not required. Students may take notes but may not record the hearing.
 

The steps for the appeal process are as follows:

1. The dean will notify the chair of Faculty Council of a student grievance or appeal at the level of the Office of the Dean that permits a hearing. Within 24 hours, the chair will provide the dean with a receipt of the notice.

2. Within 10 business days of the submission of the appeal to the dean, the student will submit a written summary that includes the following information:

  • Action being appealed; and course number and grade or evaluation, if applicable
  • Action requested
  • Justification for request
  • Outline of effort and actions taken to date to obtain consideration of the request


The dean reserves the right to ask for points of clarification that must be provided within five business days of the query.

Within 20 business days of the submission of the appeal to the dean, a College of Health Sciences designee as designated by the committee (someone from the student’s progress and promotions committee) will submit a written account of the evidence against the student, along with a summary of the account and appendices providing the evidence. The dean reserves the right to ask for points of clarification that must be provided within five business days of the query.

Formal rules of evidence shall not be applicable. Evidence presented should be reasonably related to the issue before the committee and shall not be overly repetitious. All evidence shall be admissible unless clearly redundant or irrelevant to the issue being reviewed. The student may call witnesses on their behalf. The chair of the appeals committee shall have the right to limit witnesses based on redundancy or relevance to the issue.

3. The student appeal summary will be submitted to the chair of the appeals committee, who will then schedule a hearing for the appeal - to occur within 15 business days of the receipt of the written summaries. The appeal hearing will be scheduled for one hour and 30 minutes within one of the classrooms or conference rooms.

4. The hearing will be convened by the chair of the appeals committee. At the hearing, the following people will attend: the five selected members of the standing committee, including the chair of the appeals committee, and the student. The dean or designee may attend as an observer during the hearing. The student may choose to have at the hearing a representative, who may be an attorney, serving in a non-speaking role in support for the student. The committee may have at the hearing a University attorney, who will serve only in an advisory capacity. 

5. The role of the committee members is to (a) hear the grievance or appeal, (b) consider all evidence, (c) ask clarifying questions as needed and (d) make a recommendation to the dean based on a preponderance of the evidence.  

6. The College of Health Sciences designee from the student’s progress and promotions committee will present evidence concerning the student.

7. The student will present their evidence in support of their grievance or appeal and shall have the burden of establishing that their request should be granted. At the conclusion of the hearing, the chair will excuse the student prior to the committee’s deliberations.

8. A designated committee member will take summary notes, including time, what evidence is presented by whom and final disposition of the committee. A decision will be reached by a majority vote of the five committee members.

9. Following deliberations, the committee will provide a recommendation to the dean, which should include a summary of the evidence presented at the hearing. The dean will consider the committee’s recommendation and render a final decision.

Committees

The senior administrative and policy body of the College of Health Sciences is the Chairs Council. Its membership consists of the chairpersons of each of the college’s departments and a representative of the Faculty Council.

The senior representative body of the College of Health Sciences is the Faculty Council. Its membership comprises faculty members representing all departments and ranks.

The Committee on Senior Faculty Appointments and Promotions recommends all promotions and appointments of faculty to senior ranks. It is elected by the faculty and has representatives from all departments in the college.

In addition, the dean may appoint special committees and task forces of the college to meet specific college needs, such as strategic planning.